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Smashing Chickpeas

Smashing Chickpeas

(serves 1-2)

This recipe is one of my go-to ideas for when I don’t have much time to cook.

  • 1 cup canned chickpeas
  • a little under 1 cup spaghetti sauce or pizza sauce (about 200g)
  • salt, if desied

Combine and smash with a fork. Looks weird, tastes terrific!

Katie is the baker, photographer, and author of the popular blog Chocolate-Covered Katie. Her favorite food is chocolate, and she believes in eating a balanced diet that includes dessert every single day. More about Katie—> 
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  1. Claire says:

    Ah that’s so cool that he reacted well! I always feel a bit embarassed (as a wheat and dairy intolerant girl who likes her healthy food!) since I think they’ll judge me as a faddy eater, who’s deliberately cutting things out to lose weight. Hate that! Luckily most people react with “OMG that must be hard!”. I’d really rather not have these issues, seriously!

  2. I feel awkward telling people about it sometimes, because they seem to thing I’m really high maintenance when I tell them I’m a vegan! haha Most people seem to be pretty cool with it. Usually they just say something like “How can you give up cheese?!?!” haha

  3. The Smashing Chickpeas sound great! :)

  4. I love your comment “After all, I don’t think their diet is the best, so why should I be offended if they don’t like mine?” So true. I am such a people pleaser and am having to come to a place where I’m not bothered by people’s opinions of my diet/lifestyle/parenting/choices/etc.

    In Living Raw Food, Serma Meln….(can’t remember how to spell her last name) makes a comment that when people ask her if she is allowed to eat certain things she always thinks “I am allowed to eat anything. I choose not to eat certain things.”

    1. Hehe I pity Sarma when she was a little girl and had to learn to spell her own last name!
      But what a great comment. My mom tells me that sometimes, when I say, “I can’t eat that.” She’ll be like, “Well, you COULD; you just don’t WANT to.” Ok mom, if we’re being 100% literal ;)…

    2. Hela says:

      that´s defo a great comment!! i feel exactly the same with my diet (part vegan, part vegetarian). i can´t stand it when people say like “how can you disclaim this or that?”…
      i am really proud of my diet and am ok with telling everybody about it, but what bothers me sometimes is how judgemental people are and how less they know about vegetarians/vegans!

  5. I feel pretty awkward tellling people, especially in England- veganism is much more rare here than in the USA, and people do judge :(

    1. Oh it’s true! Veganism is so much more mainstream over here now! If people give me weird looks, I just say, “Well Ellen DeGenerous, who’s like the new Oprah, is vegan, so it’s not as uncommon/fringe as you might think!”

      1. Emma says:

        I always tell people Paul McCartney is a vegan. That kind of wakes them up a little.

    2. Eric Jaffa says:

      britchickruns –

      Vegans are rare in most parts of the US, too.

  6. Jennifer - jcd says:

    Ahhhh, Smashing Chickpeas! You and my husband must have been on the same brainwave, because he made chickpeas in pasta sauce for supper too. It tasted so good. We put the leftovers atop pita bread and made pizza the next day.

    Any-who… I’m so happy your new beau was so accepting of your vegan lifestyle. I always feel a bit awkward telling people I am vegan, but it is getting easier. Most of the time it goes over really well but the odd time it is pure disaster. Confidence helps, as does knowledge and an open non-threatening attitude. And great vegan treats… you can win everyone over with fudge babies and cookies. :-)

    1. I wasn’t going to smash them at first, but they weren’t holding the sauce very well. Smash = problem solved!

      1. Jennifer - jcd says:

        Ours weren’t mashed, but my husband’s solution wa to cook them in the sauce until the sauce was thicker and stuck to the chickpeas more. I’ll tell him that mashing is faster and easier and just as tasty. :-)

  7. Tricia says:

    lol, i always feel awkward when telling people that i’m a vegetarian because i’m afraid that they’ll see me as a snob or something, or like i’m gonna be offended when they eat meat. I’m not. They always think it’s really hard, but it’s really quite simple.
    P.s., i made the strawberry shortcake in a bowl and loved it :)

    1. Aw Tricia, I’m so excited you made it!!

  8. Eric Jaffa says:

    I lived on Long Island, NY in 1988.

    I didn’t know any vegans at the time. I hadn’t heard the term “vegan” yet.

    1. Wow, I was still a baby back then! I don’t think I heard the term “vegan” til I was in high school!

  9. good for you! Sounds like a catch already. I think that vegan shouldn’t feel impolite or uncomfortable about telling others. I have before but the longer Im vegan the less it bothers me.

  10. vegetalion says:

    When I first went vegan, I only knew one other vegan, and she was loud and preachy and very PETA-esque about her veganism, which is the opposite way I approach being vegan. So I never told anyone unless they asked, because I was hesitant to ever be labeled as preachy, self-righteous, etc, just because of my ethics. But after a couple years (and after meeting a lot more vegans) I realized that I shouldn’t let one bad apple spoil the bunch–I am proud of my veganism, and shouldn’t keep it like a secret! So whenever I end up talking restaurants/recipes/food with anyone, I mention it.

    1. Emma says:

      I agree. Man do preachy PETA vegans drive me crazy. I wish more vegans took the more humble approach to it, because I have come across more than one person that tells me all vegans are crazy PETA preaching environmentalists!

  11. Leslie says:

    Smashing chickpeas? I love your sense of humor! :)
    Easy meals are my favorites, and I love a big bowl of brocci!

  12. I definitely feel weird telling people about my healthy habits. And you know, it shouldn’t be that way! It’s sad that unhealthy things are the norm and healthy = weird. And you have totally just given me inspiration for my next post! Thanks :)

    1. Ooh I’m super-excited to have inspired ya!
      And yeah, how exactly is a Twinkie more “normal” than an innocuous soybean? 😕

  13. Sarahishealthy says:

    I’m not a vegan, but I DO have a hard time telling boys especially about my healthy diet. They look at me and roll their eyes when I pass up a piece of cake, like “Oh it’s another salad-only girl.” I’m sorry to give us girls such a bad stereotype! But I don’t just eat salad, I promise! I might not want the white-flour cake, but it doesn’t mean I don’t enjoy my (healthy) treats every once in a while. And chocolate! So I’m not as weird as it may seem!
    :)

  14. I’m not vegan, but I do try to incorporate lots of healthy foods into my diet. One time I was at a big ole’ unhealthy buffet with my friends and all I got was a big salad and some fruit. They asked me why I didn’t get any dessert or any “real” food. (Haha, which is funny, because I was eating “real” food.) They even said I eat too much rabbit food. I hadn’t had a lot of practice telling people about my views on food, so I just said I like to eat healthy. Haha, they were confused. They didn’t understand.

  15. Roselie says:

    Actually no I ‘m proud to be a vegan and I don’t care what people say. Those who are doing the right thing are always looked down upon but I am not going to let it dicate my life. And why on earth should I be self-concious? Because I am trying not to cause deliberate pain? Because I respect and try to help innocent lives? Because I actually live with the values that most of us are tought (in some way at least) and not ignore them for just the sake of my comfort? If those people took only a moment to realize that all those things they admire (and envy) on people who live their lives honorably can actually have their practical side on veganism they’d berate themselves for being so clouded minded and letting their laziness dictate their minds and lives.
    love your thoughts by the way .“After all, I don’t think their diet is the best, so why should I be offended if they don’t like mine?” Soo true.

  16. Around here people have usually already “heard” we’re vegan when I meet them, but just in case they didn’t know I wear a necklace that says “vegan”. I’m proud to be unapologetically vegan!! :)

  17. Kiersten says:

    I am very proud to tell people that I’m vegan, even when I get irritating responses from them.

  18. Leah says:

    I started eating chickpeas with pasta sauce this summer and love it; so quick, healthy, and tasty, and you don’t even have to waste time boiling water for pasta. Pintos are also good with pasta sauce, FYI (which surprised me).

    1. EVERYthing is good with pasta sauce!! Well, maybe not chocolate… :)

  19. McKella says:

    I’ve been experimenting with my diet a lot this year, and it’s been hard to explain to my husband and family. I eat vegan some of the time, vegetarian most of the time, omni sometimes, etc. I try to be healthy and eat what I feel like eating, and usually leave it at that.

  20. Frankie says:

    I’m really quite new with veganism as a concept – to say I’m from a meat-and-potatoes family would be misleading: try grease-and-starch family. You get the idea :)

    I have, tho, been experimenting with a plant-based diet since my boy started working away during the week (if my experiments are disasters, I’ve only got myself to answer to!!). So far, it’s feeling pretty damn good, and it’s really encouraging me to try new things.

    My boy, though, is from Moscow. When asked what vegan was in Russian he just looked blank (not totally unfamilar, i admit). Go figure…

    1. Hehehehe “grease and starch” reminds me of my grandma’s kitchen: fried bacon sitting on the counter, pasta on the stove (for breakfast?!), and a huge tub of lard in the freezer!

  21. Danielle says:

    I used to feel really uncomfortable telling people I was vegan (for the judgements that you mentioned above). But I’ve become a lot more open about it! Because seriously…if someone is going to judge you based on your eating habits then they’re not worth your time 😉

    The other day, one of my friends (who recently found out I was vegan), asked what I had for dinner and I said “Soup, english muffin, & chickenless salad” and he responded by looking sad and saying “that sounds so bland.” hahah if only people read my blog… :)

    1. Seriously! Your food is ANYthing but bland! I would’ve given a right arm (maybe not mine hehe) for a slice of your red velvet cake the other day!!

  22. Yes, I don’t bring up my dairy-free-ness unless needed or unless they ask. People don’t get it, and I often don’t feel like explaining :) Plus, if I had a dollar for every time I had to listen to “I could NEVER live without cheese …”

    Anywho, so glad the hottie is cool with it!

    1. Ugh yeah, I think I hear that one more than “Where do you get your protein?” which is saying something, because sometimes it seems EVERYone asks the protein question!

  23. Krystina says:

    My veganism/eating habits are actually some of the first things I discuss with new boys/people. It’s a huge part of who I am so I have no reason to shy away.

  24. Run Sarah says:

    The chickpea and pasta sauce combo sounds great! My meals can be a bit ‘out there’ to some – so sometimes I worry about strange looks etc when I whip out my packed lunch, but for the most part, I don’t care too much.

  25. Caroline says:

    Mmmm your lunches look soo delicious and not weird at all (at least to a weirdo like me)!

    I don’t come out and talk about my diet or use it to define me. I don’t really fit into a dietary category anyway…other than produce- and bread-loving pescetarian…and that’s a bit of a mouthful. If people talk to me long enough or watch me eat, they’ll get it. I also think that I’ll have a more positive effect on people if I just lead by example anyway…like they see me eating a plant-based and healthy meal that looks really, really good. Then they’ll be intrigued by how delicious healthy whole food can be.

  26. Lucy says:

    Hi Katie, I’ve been following your blog for a few months now and have enjoyed it! I’m not vegan but I do try to make dairy free and healthy things to eat. For example, yesterday was my 2 year olds birthday and I decided to make a peanut butter and chocolate (carob) pie totally dairy and refined sugar free with some coconut milk ice cream. I was nervous feeding my family this for dessert because it was so different. My husband thought it was delicious so we went with it. My dad hated it and my husband said when I was out of the room my dad would say 3 or 4 times how much he didn’t like it. Almost like he was upset that I didnt’ have a traditional sugary overly frosted cake. And I love my dad and I was a little hurt when I heard that he said over and over that he didn’t like it. Plus it was a lot of time and effort to make it so he could of at least been polite. He openly showed his rebellion by eating the rest of our whipped cream out of the can (I provided that compromise for my familys sake). So yes it is definitely hard to tell people about the things I make and how I’m trying to be healthy. But I think that people judge us so harshly sometimes because they ultimately feel guilty about their diet. My dad has had cancer amidst other problems and I openly told him that she sugary and refined foods are cancer causing. Instead of telling people I just try to lead by example instead. Me and my husband use to be vegetarian and are wanting to go back to at least that. Some of my husbands family members have been vegan and all raw so we definitely have a testimony of what that lifestyle can do. Hopefully one day we can cut all of the junk out of our diet. Sorry to vent but I guess that question hit close to home for me!

    1. Hi Lucy! Oh no, I’m actually GLAD you vented, because it makes ME feel like I’m not alone in struggling with others’ comments about my healthy diet. I definitely agree with your statement that sometimes others judge out of guilt. And sometimes they judge simply because people are afraid of what they don’t understand!

  27. Tomato sauce + chickpeas sounds so good!

    I don’t talk about my eating habits with too many people offline. Not many people are interested, or I just don’t know that many people IRL, LOL. 😀

    Jenn

  28. I’m fine with telling people my diet up front- that way there’s no awkward “oh..thanks for making this burger for me..but I don’t eat meat” moment later on. Plus, they usually think it’s pretty cool too meet a pescatarian (or vegetarian, vegan..anything out of the normal :P)
    It’s cool he’s a tofu eater! Most guys are like “what? soy bean curd..? I’ll stick with my chicken fingers.” haha

  29. Katie says:

    I’m always a little hesitant to tell people about my eating habits. For some reason, I feel SO guilty if someone makes something for me and I don’t eat that food. But I’m slowly learning that it’s okay to eat how i want to eat – despite what others think!

  30. Anonymous says:

    It’s funny that you posted this now, because I was just thinking about this yesterday. A guy I know asked me out for dinner…he didn’t know that I’m a vegan (and gluten free, and I don’t eat processed soy, which limits the places I can go to eat). I was really scared to say anything to him…I know that he’s a fast food loving meat eater. This person barely knows me and I don’t want his first impression of me to be that I’m weird or uptight. But on the other hand, if he makes that kind of assumption about me, do I really want to spend time with him anyway? I’m not sure what to do!

    1. Hey miss anonymous commenter (hehe),
      Be sure to check out C’s comment, right under yours. I definitely second her advice to call ahead and ask ahead of time… or maybe you can casually suggest a place to go where you KNOW there’ll be food you can eat, without telling him beforehand of your diet preferences. Then, when you’re already there and eating happily, you can slip it into the conversation!

  31. shesarunner says:

    Katie, the above anonymous comment is from me (Lauren from She’s a Runner…just in case it does that again!). I’m not sure why it says anonymous. I’m signed into WordPress? Anyway, didn’t want you to think I’m an “anonymous commenter”

  32. I don’t typically toot my vegan horn. I would say that most people at work probably have no idea since it hasn’t come up. If I’m going to eat at someone’s house, I make sure to tell them, but I always bring my own dish to pass. I don’t want people to feel put out because I’m coming to a party.

    If I’m invited out to a restaurant, I usually contact the restaurant to see if there’s anything they can do for me. A perfect example was when my aunt decided to celebrate my gma’s bday at the clubhouse. I called ahead to see if there was anything they could whip up for my bf and I and they even provided us with a mini menu of vegan meals. Pretty awesome!

  33. Runner girl says:

    Wow!
    When you didn’t answer my question the other day, I figured you were so busy because you obviously have a huge following, and I figured you forgot. I never even dreamed I’d have my name mentioned in one of your posts! Thank you so much Katie, for all you do!

  34. Ilana says:

    I’ve been vegetarian since I was twelve, vegan since 22 :) At first after I transitioned to vegan, it was a little difficult, especially around my family who had always known “Okay she doesn’t eat meat but she does eat cheese” – like that’s somehow more “comfortable” or “acceptable.” But I don’t preach, and I don’t really talk about it unless someone asks – it’s MY choice, just like it was my choice to wear this shirt or these shoes, and no one questions me about those choices, right?? And more than that I really find most people just don’t care. Like if I went out to dinner with friends and ordered a salad and a side of veggies I highly doubt anyone would look at me and say, “How come you’re not getting a chicken dish?”
    One time I told a good friend I had become vegan and her response was, “Ewwwwwww why?!!!” And that really upset me so I told her, listen I don’t judge what you eat so you don’t have to judge what I eat. And she completely apologized and told me that her one experience with “vegan food” was negative, and tries to be really understanding now. Other than her, most of my friends and family either think it’s “cool” or are totally ambivalent to it.
    On the other hand, my boyfriend used to really NOT get it – he’d always say “It’s just a little bit of meat,” but eventually he came around to understand it. Now he always asks me questions about health and food and stuff – AND he doesn’t eat dairy :) It’s not vegan but it’s a step, and it’s nice to have him on board a little bit.

  35. Laura says:

    I always feel a bit awkward when i have my fruit (and such like) at breaktime at school when my friends are shovelling down their crisps and chocolate! They’ve learnt to accept it though, but still don’t understand!!
    He eats tofu? GOOD BOY! xx

  36. Stefanie says:

    I don’t tell anyone I am vegan unless it is important. It is hard for me because i’m afraid of what they might think. For the people that I have told I am vegan, they always comment on how hard it most be. I’m glad your new boyfriend reacted positivly when you told him you were vegan. It makes things a lot easier. :)

  37. Alexis says:

    That is so nice of SSH to accept your veganism (and like tofu!) Very open minded of him :)
    I am lacto-ovo pescatarian, so I almost never have to worry when I get invited out to eat. Even at friends’ houses, I can usually eat what they do (though sometimes that means just eating more of the side dishes and forgoing the main course.)
    Still, it is nice when I meet someone very tolerant. The world would be incredibly peaceful if we began to accept all of the various ways of eating/lifestyles/religions/etcetera… and that includes feeling secure in our own. So great that you have come to terms with that!

  38. Lorin says:

    The chickpeas look good! I will definetely have to try that. I’m a vegetarian and I feel like some people always think right away “Oh, so you’re a health freak!” and I’m not. I like eating desserts and chocolate. I sometimes feel embarassed about it and I always feel like I have to explain myself. But now that I have been a vegetarian for awhile I’m learning to ignore some of the annoying things people say and just be happy that I’m eating the way I want and being healthy at the same time.

  39. Rachael says:

    I think most people are more afraid that I’ll judge them and go on a tangent about animal rights when I express my eating habits – I’ve never encountered a negative reaction from anyone. Even those folks who have questioned me – my parents, back in the day – do so from a good place, usually concern for nutrition. Once they’re better educated and aware, the concern passes into acceptance!
    My meals continue to look odd to others, but I’m not overly concerned about it. I know what works for me, and sometimes the oddest combinations and mushiest, stirred up concoctions just taste good!

  40. Yes! I used to feel very awkward and embarrassed about what I eat (despite the fact that it’s very heathy)! Freshman and Sophomore year lunches were awful for me.

  41. eatandrun says:

    Woo hoo for a tofu-eating boy!

  42. I love love chickpeas in tomato sauce! One of my favorite meals.

    That’s awesome how accepting he was. Sounds like a great guy! I still feel awkward about what I eat, and usually try not to bring it up. I’ve noticed that as long as I smile and pretend not to be embarrassed, people don’t care and are much more accepting.

  43. Glad your boy was okay with you being vegan! And I agree why can’t non vegans and vegans be friends ??? I am always nervous about telling people about my eats. I haven’t even told some of my best friends about my blog. They know I eat “healthy” but not everything else, haha.

  44. Jess says:

    So sweet that the boy is cool about you being vegan! AND he likes tofu? Girl, he’s a keeper!

  45. brazilgrrl says:

    Its soo cool that he was so great about your being a vegan! Some people are so prejudiced that its nice to know that some people don’t mind at all!! Also, the chickpeas sound AMAZING!!!! I will have to try them at some point in the near future!! I myself am not vegan, but am interested in trying new foods at all times! =D

  46. ohkansascity says:

    Now that I’m single, after 6 years with the same person, I find it incredibly hard trying to explain to someone new my diet. Because my diet not only is complicated, but I eat weird foods anyways so it takes some serious getting used to. And it makes me feel very self conscious talking about it. It’s definitely weird.

    1. ohkansascity says:

      ps. That smashed chickpea meal looks amazing. I think I’ll be making that tomorrow. =)

  47. That’s so awesome that he was so chill about it!! I used to feel really awkward telling people I made the transition from vegetarian to vegan, but now that I’m more confident, I just don’t care. Most of the time people are really cool about it. Sometimes I get stupid comments like “my dinner eats your dinner for dinner!” I seriously hate those, but I try to be calm and not get mad. I don’t ever comment on other people’s eats, so I don’t understand why they must say something to me. The vibe I get is, “ugh, why do you have to be so HEALTHY!” Like they think that’s a bad thing, and no way to live. Luckily, my family is SUPER supportive and will find fun vegan recipes to cook for me. They even entertained my 100% raw days. For the doubters, I just cook for them like “SEE, tastes good and makes you feel good!” It usually quiets them a little. :)

  48. BroccoliHut says:

    I totally feel awkward about my eating habits! I just did a post last week about how I change the way I eat around other people…

  49. I used to get a lot of flack about the clean eating thing. People would make fun of me because I didn’t want to eat preservatives. It used to upset me, but it doesn’t anymore, because I need to do what is good for me and my family, regardless of what other people think! And you would think I would know that at my age ;), but I guess it was more of my feelings getting hurt than anything. I persevered, though! And I’m proud of that. :)

  50. Rachel says:

    Thank you for posting your Smashing Chickpeas recipe, Katie! It looks DELISH, so I went to the grocery store tonight! Now, I’m all set to make your recipe for dinner tomorrow 😀

  51. Anonymous says:

    hmmm…first off, just want to say that i am an extremely tolearant person of all healthy eating paths. i eat every which way: vegetarian, vegan, raw, clean. i don’t necessarily subscribe to one eating pattern. the only food i have completly eliminated from my diet is red meat. over the weekend, we had a friend and his wife in town visiting his parents. they recently became vegans in january. i am completely okay with this. prior to this both of them had followed a traditional diet then transitioned to vegetarian before becoming vegan. there was one incident during our visit that greatly upset me though. his parents made dinner and followed their vegan eating plan. his grandparents were also visiting so they did grill some sausage for them and his dad. as we were finishing our meal, his mom brought over a plate of homemade muffins and asked if anyone was interested. she started telling us all of the yummy ingredients which included flax, whole wheat flour, blueberries, cinnamon, homemade applesauce. our friend asked if there were any eggs used. his mom mentioned that she used one egg white. our friend and his wife looked at each other shook their heads and said they would pass because of the egg white. his mom who had been so proud one minute earlier instantly deflated. her smile fell and she shrugged her shoulders and then got up and left the room. i was very upset with them on principle. we live in a super small town where things like egg replacer aren’t readily available. because i cook a lot i know how to use veganized eggs (flax and water). his mom took the time to provide vegan meals during the length of their stay and also attempted to make a sweet treat which she thought was vegan. i felt like they should have taken a muffin, split it, and ate it. they really hurt his mom’s feelings. am i overreacting? i respect their veganism but i can’t see hurting someone’s feelings over one egg white especially when they visit once a year.

    1. Hmmm… tricky situation! :(
      I just wrote a post with a similar topic: http://chocolatecoveredkatie.com/2010/07/25/diet-is-not-religion/
      I guess there isn’t a right or wrong answer… but hugs to his mom, who–from the sound of it–made a sweet effort to be accommodating as much as she knew how.

  52. Cynthia K says:

    Katie, I’m so glad you did this chickpeas thing, it looks great! Pantry’s looking kind of desperate right now and I was just wondering what I’d take to work for lunch today. I have chickpeas and spaghetti sauce, though! :) Thanks for being creative!

    I cracked up quietly (bf/daughter are still sleeping!) when I saw the comment above that referred to “SSH”…he already has his own acronym! haha

    Have a delicious day!

  53. Yes! I definitely feel awkward about my eating habits because they are kind of strange. But after the first couple sentences exchanged, it becomes a really good conversation piece :)

  54. erinsloves says:

    I used to be very self-conscious when discussing my eating habits with people, because I felt like they were always judging me or what I was eating.
    Now it doesn’t really bother me, if they think I’m weird, then whatever they just think I’m weird (:

  55. Kate says:

    Awesome! I didn’t know ANYONE else did that with chickpeas…I make these at least once a week for lunch:) (But I call them spa-chicki-o’s 😉

  56. Brandae says:

    Hi Katie,
    I have a nutrition question for you. I’ve been eating vegan and gluten, soy, and corn-free for a couple months now. I’ve been curious whether I’m getting adequate omega 3s and B vitamins. Do you mind sharing what you do, if anything, about this part of your dietary needs? Thank you!
    Brandae

    1. Hi Brandae!
      I make sure to get bloodwork done at least every other year (during a routine physical), and I’ve never been low on B vitamins. But for Omega 3s, I actually do take a supplement just in case. It’s the only supplement/vitamin I take, and it’s called “Minami Nutrition Vegan DHA.” I don’t KNOW that I wouldn’t be getting enough omega 3s just by diet alone, but I’d rather be safe than sorry :).

  57. Jennifer says:

    I am not a vegan, but I am mostly vegetarian and eat a high raw food diet. My son is a very healthy eater (he’s 3) and he has allergies to both egg and dairy. I’ve found that it’s a huge struggle with my in-laws whenever we are around them. They don’t understand allergies, and also don’t understand I wouldn’t feed my son boxed macaroni and cheese even if he wasn’t allergic. They eat mainly processed foods that I would never allow him to eat. They get so excited about feeding him potato chips and the like and complain all the time about his allergies being so hard on them. They’ll do things like take us out for pizza and then get all surprised when I don’t feed him pizza. It’s really like two different worlds. I end up letting them feed him some less than healthy stuff just because I’m tired of battling it out with them. I though of typing up a list of ingredients he’s not allowed to eat and include corn syrup and hydrogenated oils on it even though he’s technically not allergic to them. That way they might think twice before letting him eat some of that stuff. I never leave him with them for very long and I’m nervous about doing so when he’s older. My MIL brought a whole bag of peanuts (which he’s allergic too) into our house when she stayed with us once. My husband made her throw them out. She also is always hounding me to feed him potatoes constantly, which I’m not sure why. It can be frustrating dealing with people so uneducated about healthy eating; especially, when it concerns the health of your children.